My 2018 in review

HAPPY NEW YEAR! (Well, it is here — though maybe not there, where you are. And if it isn’t, why are you reading this right now? Bookmark it and come back to it later!)

Like 2017, 2018 wasn’t a stellar year for me on the writing front. Or at least, that’s how I feel when I think about it — but I’m measuring that purely against the number of words I’ve written on my current novel manuscript. I’m maybe a third of the way through, and have been for a month or more. Everything has kind of … ground to a halt.

Still, one of my two resolutions for 2018 was not to be so hard on myself when I fail to meet my goals, so — in that spirit — I’m going to go over my accomplishments for the year. There have been a few firsts in there, which is actually kind of exciting when I think about it.

I released two new books: Guardian Angel and Rheia

Guardian Angel is a novella, and it’s maybe a quarter of the length of Rheia, so the grumpy cynic in me says it’s cheating, but she can go sit in the corner and sulk. Aside from anything else, urban fantasy is my jam and my comfort place, and working on Guardian Angel really helped me when I got stuck on other projects.

On the subject of Rheia, I love this book and am very proud of it. A friend told me she thought it was my best book yet, and I quietly agree with her (even as this fills me with terror regarding the next book, ahahahahasob). If you haven’t already grabbed a copy and you love the ancient world, creeping doom and/or steampunk, then may I urge you to check it out? 😉

(Actually, I technically released three books, as I also released an erotica novella, Kiss of the Succubus, under my Tammy Calder pen name. If you’re an adult and not related to me in any way, you can learn more about it here.)

I had a story published in the A Hand of Knaves anthology

Being a part of a multi-author anthology is something I’d always wanted to do, so it’s super awesome to be able to cross that off my bucket list. This one was published by the Canberra Speculative Fiction Guild, and working with the editors — Leife Shallcross and Chris Large — was a joy. 10/10, would do again.

I was part of the Shadows and Spellcraft book bundle

Again, this is something that had been on my bucket list. This urban fantasy book bundle has fifteen ebook novels and novellas, including Isla’s Inheritance — and it’s around US$4 for all of that, which is great value. And, again, working with this wonderful team of authors was both inspiring and educational. Seriously, I learned a lot.

I went out into the world and did author-y things

Okay, that’s not the best summary in the world, but bear with me. I went to the A Hand of Knaves book launch — a real-world launch, not the online ones I favour — and met new people and signed stuff. I also had a signing at BookFace here in Canberra, and signed even more stuff (mainly copies of Rheia). Given I never organised face-to-face promotional events because the awkwardness it inspires in me isn’t great, this was a pretty big deal for me.

See? Photographic proof! (Also, check out my low-key signing pen.)

A resolution round-up

At the start of 2018, I made two resolutions (one of which I’ve already mentioned):

  • Do better.
  • Forgive myself at times I don’t do better.

Comparing 2018 to 2017, I can definitely check the first one off the list. The second one … eh, it’s a work in progress.

This year, I want to finish the sci-fi draft that I’ve been wrestling with for the last few months. I’ve also got another idea that I plan to work on — stay tuned for more as the year progresses. Beyond that, my resolutions are the same as for 2018.

Do you do new year’s resolutions? Tell me in the comments below!

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Mini-Review: ‘A Hand of Knaves’ short short anthology

Rogues, thieves, pirates and ne’er-do-wells abound in speculative fiction. Sometimes heroic, sometimes villainous, often somewhere in between, rogues are as likely to steal one’s heart as one’s purse, and show little remorse while helping themselves to either.

So why do we love them? Because they’re imperfect, fallible, and even vulnerable under that carefully-maintained, world-weary exterior.

Rogues represent something we rarely see in our daily lives: ordinary people prepared to take on the “powers that be” by way of guile and subterfuge. But are they only in it for the loot, or are they–deep down–romantic at heart?

I have a policy of not rating or reviewing my own books (even over at Goodreads, where author reviews are a thing), but in this case I will, partly because I’m just one contributor, and partly because there are lots of awesome Aussie writers in here and I love to support Aussie fiction (especially by Aussie women, given I do the Australian Women Writers challenge every year). Also, in case you were wondering, I can’t profit any further from sales of this book — so there’s no financial incentive for me to lie. 😉

I’m honestly a little blown away by the talent on display in AHOK (especially because I apparently duped the editors into letting my story sit alongside the others!). There are rollicking space pirate adventures; beautiful stories full of slow magic and whimsy; time-travel and psychic tales that twisted my brain in knots; and vignettes that were gorgeously atmospheric and left me wanting more. There are LGBTQ+ and POC stories, too, which I always love reading. Oh, and one story that is told entirely in quotes from witnesses. (Literally just extracts of dialogue, but you still can see the tale emerge!)

If you can track down a copy of this anthology, please do. I strongly recommend it!


Book launch: ‘A Hand of Knaves’ (in which our hero goes to a party)

Yours truly (in the glasses), along with Leife Shallcross, Grace Maslin, Simon Petrie (also in glasses, but not me), and a bunch of other lovely folks whose names I didn’t catch because I am a terrible human

Last night I went to the book launch party for A Hand of Knaves, the short story anthology that features a story of mine called “The Best Heist Yet”. I confess I was feeling a little nervous — my imposter syndrome was registering off the charts, and I didn’t know anyone there (except my bestie, who came along for moral support and took some pics for me — thanks, mate!).

I felt better when we first arrived and found the dealers room, where people were selling books they had written. I picked up the third book in the Antipodean Queen series (I reviewed the first one here if you want to check it out) and another that the author described as a sci-fi murder mystery. Whee!

I didn’t have to worry about the launch either — it was a lot of fun and everyone was lovely. There were three readings (which were amazing and didn’t help with the imposter syndrome any), plus champagne (which offset the effect of the readings). And I got to sign ALL THE BOOKS.

It was a ton of fun, and made me wonder why I haven’t done this sooner — all of my book launches for my own books have been strictly online affairs. It also drove home that I really should join the local author community and, you know, get out of the house more. I’ll definitely look into that.

After I finish this next book I’m reading. 😉


Rogues, thieves, pirates and ne’er-do-wells abound in speculative fiction. Sometimes heroic, sometimes villainous, often somewhere in between, rogues are as likely to steal one’s heart as one’s purse, and show little remorse while helping themselves to either.

So why do we love them? Because they’re imperfect, fallible, and even vulnerable under that carefully-maintained, world-weary exterior.

Rogues represent something we rarely see in our daily lives: ordinary people prepared to take on the “powers that be” by way of guile and subterfuge. But are they only in it for the loot, or are they–deep down–romantic at heart?


Cover reveal: ‘A Hand of Knaves’ anthology

As I mentioned in my last post, the A Hand of Knaves anthology (in which I have a story) is having its book birthday this month — on 30 September, to be exact. And now I have a sexy, sexy cover to share with you. The cover art is by Canberra local Shauna O’Meara. It has been a delight to work with the team for this anthology, and I can’t wait to read the rest of the stories.

I don’t have links for this one yet, but when I do I’ll share them on the socials. In the meantime, enjoy this gorgeous piece of art. ❤

Rogues, thieves, pirates and ne’er-do-wells abound in speculative fiction. Sometimes heroic, sometimes villainous, often somewhere in between, rogues are as likely to steal one’s heart as one’s purse, and show little remorse while helping themselves to either.

So why do we love them? Because they’re imperfect, fallible, and even vulnerable under that carefully-maintained, world-weary exterior.

Rogues represent something we rarely see in our daily lives: ordinary people prepared to take on the “powers that be” by way of guile and subterfuge. But are they only in it for the loot, or are they — deep down — romantic at heart?

Nineteen science fiction, fantasy, and horror tales from twenty of Australia’s best established and emerging writers.

Eugen Bacon
Amy Brown
David Coleman
Tom Dullemond
Maureen Flynne
Rebecca Fraser
Edwina Harvey
Isobel Johnstone
Grace Maslin
Chris McGrane
Claire McKenna
Cassandra Page
CH Pearce
Simon Petrie
Louise Pieper
Robert Porteous
Charlotte Sophia
Helen Stubbs
David Versace
Angus Yeates

Buy links

Coming soon


‘A Hand of Knaves’ anthology — a quick announcement

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Rogues, thieves, pirates and ne’er-do-wells abound in speculative fiction. Sometimes heroic, sometimes villainous, often somewhere in between, rogues are as likely to steal one’s heart as one’s purse, and show little remorse while helping themselves to either.

So why do we love them? Because they’re imperfect, fallible, and even vulnerable under that carefully-maintained, world-weary exterior.

Rogues represent something we rarely see in our daily lives: ordinary people prepared to take on the “powers that be” by way of guile and subterfuge. But are they only in it for the loot, or are they – deep down – romantic at heart?

Above is the summary from the call for submissions for the A Hand of Knaves anthology, which is being published by the Canberra Speculative Fiction Guild in the second half of 2018. And I’m very excited to announce that one of my short stories, ‘The Best Heist Yet’, has been picked for inclusion. You can see the full list of authors and story titles here.

I’m thrilled to be working with the CSFG on this project, and will keep you in the loop as new information comes to hand.

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Me, keeping my cool about this announcement. (Image belongs to Disney etc etc.)

And now, returning you to your regularly scheduled long weekend (or not)…